Parsonage Update: Gaylor v. Lew

In 2011, the Freedom From Religion Foundation (“FFRF”) challenged the constitutionality of the parsonage tax exemption contained in Section 107 of the Internal Revenue Code. Section 107 allows clergy to exclude certain housing expenses from their gross income. FFRF’s...

The Minimum Wage Anomaly

It is difficult to reconcile the passage of multiple state ballot measures to increase the minimum wage with a rather poor showing for Democrats in Tuesday’s midterm elections.  The Wall Street Journal tries to explain.  ...

Summer at the NLRB

The National Labor Relations Board has been busy this summer making bold decisions that could have far-reaching implications. The NLRB’s most publicized action this summer occurred on July 29 when the Office of the General Counsel announced that it would treat...

Add Nevada to the List

The list of states that have enacted laws prohibiting employers from accessing applicants’ and employees’ private social media sites keeps growing, and Nevada is the latest addition. This past summer, Governor Brian Sandoval signed Assembly Bill 181 into law. Section...

And Oregon Makes Ten

Social Media Protections Extended to Employees and Job Applicants in Oregon. Add Oregon to the list of states enacting laws prohibiting employers from accessing their employees’ private social media sites.  The new Oregon law becomes effective January 1, 2014 and...

Honoring Labor

In honor of Labor Day, former NLRB Member and Chair Wilma Liebman reminds us of what labor unions mean to this country and why they’re worth fighting...

Being Your Own Best “Free Agent”

If you are in the overwhelming category of employees who are not covered by a collective bargaining agreement, then you are in essence a free agent. With the evolution of the workplace, acceleration of new technologies, and the increase in job specialization, many...

Update to NLRB’s Notice Posting Rule

Due to some court challenges by business interests, the NLRB has been temporarily enjoined from implementing the rule requiring employers to post notices informing employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act.  See our previous blog post to find...

A Return to 1934?

Section 1 of the National Labor Relations Act (from the original 1935 Wagner Act) is premised on facilitating the flow of commerce by reducing industrial “strife and unrest” through collective bargaining and peaceful dispute resolution mechanisms.  In light of the...

Captive Audiences

Once again, our friend Dmitri has an interesting piece on labor law in today’s union-unfriendly environment. Check out this piece in the Providence Journal on employer captive audience speeches and employees’ First Amendment rights. (originally posted...

Chipping Away at Title VII

The Supreme Court has just taken another bite out of employees’ rights to challenge workplace discrimination. The decision limits employees’ ability to redress discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 unless they can point to a...